Unhappy Relationships Increase Suicidal Thoughts

Being in a relationship does not necessarily, in itself, protect people from having suicidal thoughts. This is the finding of a recent study into the correlation between relationship status and suicidal thoughts conducted by scientists from MedUni Vienna’s Institute of Social Medicine and the Department of Basic Psychological Research and Research Methods at the Psychology Faculty of Vienna University.

In the general population, those who are young and middle-aged, and particularly those who are in a happy relationship, have a low risk of having suicidal thoughts. This is emphasised by the researchers, speaking on the occasion of the upcoming World Suicide Prevention Day on 10 September.

According to the results of the study, which have now been published in the magazine “Crisis,” the greatest risk factors are exhibited by people who are unhappy in their relationship. Even people who are single have a comparatively lower risk.

“Data so far clearly show that a person’s suicide risk is lower if he/she is in a relationship. However, the recent study suggests that the level of satisfaction with the relationship is also important,” explains Benedikt Till of MedUni Vienna. In the general middle-aged population, those who are unhappy in an existing relationship, in which there are unresolved conflicts, are more likely to have suicidal thoughts. People who are in a happy relationship have the lowest risk.

The greater the number of unresolved conflicts in a relationship, the greater the likelihood of suicidal thoughts, feelings of hopelessness and depression. The commonest themes that were mentioned under the point “unresolved conflict” or “we no longer talk about this issue” were as follows: the partner’s temperament (19.9%), communication (17.4%), (bad) personal habits (17.3%), sexuality (16.0%) and housework (15.5%).

If you think CBT Therapy can help you, then you can reach us on 0207 929 7911 or send us a message here to talk to one of our private CBT Therapist about how we can help you and your partner. 

Join the conversation

* Indicates a required field